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The Recovery Principle

Scheduling recovery practices into any training and exercise program is essential to high-level performance across the board. For athletes and recreational fitness lovers alike, building in a recovery program into one’s weekly fitness routine allows the body to replenish energy stores, optimise muscle synthesis, and repair damaged tissues.

Below we will discuss some of the most effective Body Recovery methods the Elite Sarms team have found to be most effective along the way in their fitness and wellness journey’s. Let’s dive in;

Your Post-Workout Regimen - The most important recovery window


Stretching
. It is vital to include stretching as a gentle calming routine for the body to counterbalance high-intensity workouts. Full-body stretches helps ease tension and tightness which relieves pain and expedites recovery from any type of physical activity.

Stretching also increases blood flow and aids in the delivery of nutrients and oxygen to sore muscles, preventing injury during and after workouts, while increasing joint mobility and range of motion for better performance.


Foam rolling
. Foam rolling is a type of self-massage that allows you to alleviate tightness or trigger points —which are dense muscle knots in the fascia — by leaning into a foam roller and ‘rolling out’ tight muscles and joints.


Foam rolling helps injury prevention by retaining muscle length and alleviating tension and tightness before it can build into an overuse injury. This simple routine also increases blood flow and elasticity in the body’s connective tissues namely the muscles, joints, and fascia - which facilitates mobility, relaxation, and athletic output.


Cryotherapy.
Stands for cold-therapy. By incorporating cryotherapy into your post-workout routine, you can provide immediate and longer-term results that will help you feel less pain, have tighter skin, and reduce the inflammatory process - speeding up the recovery process.

The practice of using very cold temperatures to treat pain and feel energized can be traced back to ancient times with practices carried out like ice-pool plunging, which were part of a holistic treatment program to stimulate the immune system, build stamina and avoid disease.

This ancient technology has since been greatly rediscovered in todays society as to the powerful health benefits of exposing the body to extreme temperatures for short periods of time to active the CNS (central nervous system) and immune system as well as move stagnant energy throughout the entire body - including blood, minerals and nutrients.

As inflammation is a major issue for athletes and fitness enthusiasts alike, many will turn to ice baths and cryotherapy creams to diminish muscle soreness and accelerate tissue recovery as this is an effective recovery method proven since ancient times.


Beneficial Supplements and Sarms for Recovery


Whey Protein Isolates.
WPIs are concentrated, fast-absorbing proteins that supply the muscles after a workout with amino acids, particularly BCAAs needed to repair and grow muscles. Studies have proven, the sooner you can consume whey protein following your workout, the better, given its a clean WPI source.

Healthy Fats. Consuming Omega-3s - EPA and DHA, found in fish oil supplements or fatty fish like salmon, algae and krill can help offset free radical damage produced during strenuous training. They act as anti-inflammatory agents, while keeping the arteries clear and maintaining efficient blood flow to the muscles, and even the brain. 

Curcumin and CBD. Cannabidiol works by interacting with the body’s endocannabinoid system and regulating receptor activity, resulting in significant reduction of inflammation and pain. Curcumin, the active component of Turmeric, have many scientifically proven recovery and health benefits due to its potent ant-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties.

Blending the two may help the fitness person to reap numerous benefits from this synergistic pair including pain and stress relief and faster muscle recovery.


Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators or SARMs.
These novel compounds are simply one of the greatest milestones in the Health and Fitness industry.

The key feature of SARMS is their high selectivity, allowing them to target muscles, bones and connective tissues specifically resulting in accelerated recovery and optimal muscle and fitness improvements. Below we take a closer look at Elite Sarms and their specific recovery qualities:  

  • Decavar®  (MK-2866) – Research studies on Decavar® have repeatedly proven its impressive rapid repair and recovery boosting abilities on connective tissues and skeletal muscle. 

    Decavar® - works great in restoring sore muscles and even exceeds expectations in repairing torn rotator cuffs, stretched ligaments and even fractures!

    Decavar®’s - restorative properties repair damaged tissues and re-establish functionality at a much faster rate.

  • Physique 400® (LGD 4033) - Clinical trials show LGD 4033’s ability to increase strength levels, improve lean muscle mass, and enhance vascularity which improves the restoration of muscle after physical activity. 

    Physique 400® (LGD 4033) had also shown to prevent muscle and bone wasting on test volunteers with functional limitations due to injury, illness or aging.

 

  • Stanazine®  (S4) - A number of studies on SARMs, support Stanazine®’s restorative effects on lean muscle mass. Moreover, results suggest an increase in muscle strength, therefore ensuring its protection when cutting down calorie intake and/or intensive physical training.

 

  • Tight® (Rad 140) – More popularly known as the ‘nootropic’ among the SARMs range, Tight® (Rad 140) is a reliable post-workout supplement thanks to its muscle strengthening and bulking prowess. Tight® (Rad 140) immensely improves stamina and endurance during high-intensity training allowing for naturally faster recovery.

 


Intel Sources:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4111291/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7528560/

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22459616/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4018048/